Stop Ruining Your Web Design

Stop Ruining Your Web Design

Many people fail to realize they might be the root cause of a botched web design or a slow process. When it comes to web design or any design for that matter, there is a method to the madness and too many hands in the pot can lead to problems. Maybe you are too close to the project, maybe you have a hard time letting others do for you, or you just can’t stop dictating what you want and there is no other way but your way. These common traits can lead to a stalled process, poor design, and a waste of better-spent dollars. So, here is our two cents.

Remove your bias on design

Sure, you may have started in your garage as a small computer manufacturing company named after a delicious fruit (Apple, if you didn’t get the reference). Your roots are your roots. You may have an emotional tie to your logo, web design, or whatever is involved in the representation of your business. You have poured your heart and soul over hours of finding the right look and feel that satisfies your business needs. No one will ever discredit that, nor should you. But, just like Apple, their brand and logo have transformed over time.

Good designers know what it takes to implement a great design. After all, this is what they’ve trained for. Communicating your likes and dislikes will make working with a designer easier. They will gain a better understanding of who you are and what your business represents. From there, let the designer craft options that best interpret you, even if it is rehashing an old logo to make it high-resolution. With today’s evolving technology, the more responsive the better.

Let creatives create

One of the biggest hold-ups in a project can be with the design. You may have a website you like or a competitor you want to mimic, but following their designs lacks originality. What a good Marketing Strategist aims to find out is what you like and from there the designer will develop new, original designs that are unique to your company. Creative types rarely enjoy regurgitating templates that were designed by other designers when they know they can deliver something tailored for your company. Step back a bit and let the professionals take the wheel.

The nickel and dime

Aesthetics are key in a well-crafted design. Of course, in a perfect world, every line height and row will be spot on in size and shape. However, that is in a perfect world. There are many variants that come into play when executing a design. For instance, a table with a series of rows has text that varies in length and character count. This can cause text wrapping that allows it to stack nicely to hold a visually appealing row column width. If small issues like this hinder the decision-making process, the project can hit a wall and in the end, time will be spent splitting hairs to satisfy problems that were minuscule to begin with. Sometimes what you see in your head and what can be done in design simply don’t match up. It is best to share your concerns and corrections with the creative team and allow them to exercise professional judgment.

Listen more than you speak

At the end of the day, client happiness is the key to a good business relationship. But, this is a two-way street. Failing to listen to you creative professionals can land you right back in the spot that got you to them in the first place. When a designer is providing reasons why a design doesn’t work or why it makes sense to pivot to another idea, listen to them. From there, you can work together to forge a path to success. After all, to be a successful creative designer resides with the end product that their client and themselves are proud of. Look for a team that collaborates and communicates from day one. If you feel your needs are not being met, it may be time to seek another firm.

Overall, the key here is to communicate issues and ideas in a way that allows a smooth transition from an out-dated website, to a beautifully designed masterpiece ready to link to Adwords, social media and any other marketing venture. When you are faced with difficult decisions to move away from an old theme, try to remain objective in your decision-making process and listen to people who will guide you down the right path. If you start to feel a lack of value, let them know.

Josh Donelson
Josh Donelson
Marketing Strategist
Aug 7th, 2017 • Design

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